Why cyclists should be able to roll through stop signs and ride through red lights
If you've looked around a city lately, you might've noticed that many cyclists don't obey many traffic laws. They roll through stop signs, instead of coming to a complete stop, and brazenly ride through red lights if there aren't any cars coming.

Sorry, I'm one of those people. I apologize for the inconvenience. However, Vox does a great job outlining solid reasons for this silly practice with an examination of Idaho's laws:

Idaho's rule is pretty straightforward. If a cyclist approaches a stop sign, he or she needs to slow down and look for traffic. If there's already a car or another bike there, then the other vehicle has the right of way. If there's no traffic, however, the cyclist can slowly proceed. Basically, for bikers, a stop sign is a yield sign.

If a cyclist approaches a red light, meanwhile, he or she needs to stop fully. Again, if there's any oncoming traffic, it has the right of way. If there's not, the cyclist can proceed cautiously through the intersection. Put simply, red light is a stop sign.

This doesn't mean that a cyclist is allowed to blast through an intersection at full speed — which is dangerous for pedestrians, the cyclist, and pretty much everyone involved. This isn't allowed in Idaho, and it's a terrible idea everywhere.

I mean, how can it not be clearer than that? Idaho, you rock. Bring some love to New York cyclists.

(via Vox, who has excellent reporting by the way)

Ashraf Ali