Closed-minded vs. Idea Sex

“It might also be argued that the emergence of a morality of warfare is deeply objectionable because it legitimizes and institutionalizes an international activity so morally obnoxious that it should be condemned in principle and eliminated altogether from the face of the planet.”

It intrigues me, at the very least, to know that there are people out there with a very well-developed fortress of understanding. Close-minded behavior can grow from outward repulsion of a particular activity such as war. But to impede the growth of knowledge, interpretation, and contextual intelligence because of abhorrence to a particular activity actual leaves that particular individual more blind sighted than before.

I feel it is imperative for humans to really invest in diverging opinions, thought process, and communication of ideals so that everyone can benefit from what I call “idea sex” or the growth of ideas in a collaborative environment. A very complex, paradoxical affair such as war should be treated no less, promoting a greater standard for accountability and understanding relative to circumstance.

While a discussion of morality and ethics may light a fire under some, it should never come in the way of discussing a particular viewpoint or developing a standard for understanding between parties or even recognition of a particular activity that some may see as obnoxious, unnecessary, and ridiculous. War in itself, like all ideas, is beautiful. It is an art that takes precise skill to execute and deliver for maximum effect.

In addition, war continues as a vibrant dynamic of the human psyche in which all humans can be linked to. Then why should we limit our opinion because of moral objections or ethical comparison? How can we hold ourselves back from developing an international standard because we are concerned with our selfish affairs and looking at the world through rose colored classes?

Surely as humans, as a community, as individuals, as intellectuals, we can do better.

Ashraf Ali