In the Future Graphic Design Layout Will Be Automated—Subtraction

It seems safe to say that while a certain segment of graphic design will never be completely replaced by automated systems, at some point in the near future systems like this will become commonplace, either as a replacement for lower-dollar design needs, or even as a complement to big ticket design processes. Remember, there was a time when many of the world’s most famous graphic designers scoffed at the idea of ever needing a personal computer to do their work.

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Create Comment Summary Script—Adobe Acrobat

This is a fantastic script I came across that lets you export comments in an Adobe Acrobat file to a CSV (renamed to XLS, so that it pop-ups open in Excel). Makes it easy to parse a huge set of comments in a PDF.

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Between the braces—Adactio

The stuff inside the curly braces—the properties and values—that’s where the cosmetic problems get solved. It’s also the stuff that you can look up; I certainly don’t try to store all possible CSS properties and values in my head. It’s also easy to evaluate: Does it make the thing look like you want it to look? Yes? Good. It works.

The stuff outside the curly braces—the selectors—that’s harder to judge. It needs to be evaluated with lots of “what ifs”: What if this selects something you didn’t intend to? What if the markup changes? What if someone else writes some CSS that negates this?

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League of nationalists—The Economist

Inquiring after the roots of nationalism is like asking what makes people love their families or fear strangers. Scholars have suggested that nations are built around language, history, culture, territory and politics without being able to settle on any single cause. A better question is: what turns civic nationalism into the exclusive sort? There are several theories.

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2004 Toyota Camry LE V6: 340,000-Mile Used Car Review—The Truth About Cars

Evidently assembled to a high standard by a team of professionals in Kentucky, this 2004 Toyota Camry is a relatively quiet car even by modern standards. Tire hum from the 205/65R15 GT Radial Champiro IcePros is excessive, but wind noise is kept to a minimum and the 210-horsepower 3.0-liter V6 engine purrs quietly. Don’t expect jaw-dropping acceleration off the line — the five-speed automatic is geared for smoothness, not to snap off shifts. (Expect a 0-60 time above seven seconds for the old car rather than below six for the new car.) But with 220 lb-ft of torque, power is always on tap. Overtaking on a rural two-lane is a breeze.

The fact that this aged car never discourages its driver from pinning the throttle to the floor is the real story of the powertrain’s prowess. Quick? Sure, quick enough, but it’s more encouraging to discover the absence of unrefined clatter and bangs.

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How Facebook Spreads Fake News And Anti-Muslim Views In Myanmar—BuzzFeed News

Facebook’s influence in Myanmar is hard to quantify, but its domination is so complete that people in Myanmar use “internet” and “Facebook” interchangeably. According to Amara Digital, a Yangon-based marketing agency, Facebook has doubled its local base in the last year to 9.7 million monthly users. That number is likely to spike again, after Facebook launched its Free Basics program, a free, streamlined version of Facebook and a handful of other sites.

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Kakistocracy—Jury.me

Over the past few days, I've stumbled upon a word that more of us should know as it so perfectly captures this moment in time. Commit this one to memory, because you're probably going to want to use it often: Kakistocracy n. (kak·is·toc·ra·cy / kækɪsˈtɑkɹəsi)   Government by the worst persons; a form of government in which the worst persons are in power.

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Trump’s National Security Choices Reinforce His Unapologetic Views on Terrorism—NY Times

Mr. Trump moved unapologetically to realize his campaign’s vision of a nation that relentlessly enforces immigration laws; views Muslims with deep suspicion; aggressively enforces drug laws; second-guesses post-World War II alliances; and sends suspected terrorists to Guantánamo Bay or C.I.A. prisons to be interrogated with methods that have been banned as torture.

At a time when American cities have been inflamed by racial tensions, police shootings and fears over homegrown terrorism, Mr. Trump made no conciliatory gestures toward Muslims, Mexicans and African-American neighborhoods, all of which he disparaged during his campaign.

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Insights on animation from Brad Bird—Kottke

The mistake that people often make with animated films is that they love the gravity-defying aspect of it. But, if you defy gravity and then later on need to feel danger, you have a really hard time convincing the audience.

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This Is Not Normal—Joshua Foust

The presumption of normality during abnormal times is one of the most powerful weapons the authoritarian has, and that is why it is so important to recognize how profoundly abnormal Donald J. Trump will be as president. So I assembled a list.

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The Kill Chain—The Intercept

Secret military documents obtained by The Intercept offer rare documentary evidence of the process by which the Obama administration creates and acts on its kill list of terror suspects in Yemen and Somalia. The documents offer an unusual glimpse into the decision-making process behind the drone strikes and other operations of the largely covert war, outlining the selection and vetting of targets through the ranks of the military and the White House, culminating in the president’s approval of a 60-day window for lethal action.

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Passing the Baton [to Trump]—Jacobin

[Trump] is the man who will now be in control of the most powerful military and state surveillance apparatus in all of history. When Trump is inaugurated in January next year, he will take charge of a sprawling, opaque, and extremely powerful national security regime with few checks and balances.

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